WEFOUNDAivazovsky: Painting, Drawing and Watercolours from the Collections of St. Petersburg


Ivan Aivazovsky (Russian: Ива́н Константи́нович Айвазо́вский, Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի Hovhannes Ayvazovski; 29 July 1817 – 2 May 1900) was a Russian Romantic painter. He is considered one of the greatest marine artists in history. Baptized as Hovhannes Aivazian, Aivazovsky was born into an Armenian family in the Black Sea port of Feodosia and was mostly based in his native Crimea.

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The Ninth Wave ( Russian : Девятый вал , Dyevyatiy val ) is an 1850 painting by the Russian Armenian marine painter Ivan Aivazovsky . It is his best known work. [1] [2]

The title refers to an old sailing expression referring to a wave of incredible size that comes after a succession of incrementally larger waves. [3]

It depicts a sea after a night storm and people facing death attempting to save themselves by clinging to debris from a wrecked ship. The debris, in the shape of the cross, appears to be a Christian metaphor for salvation from the earthly sin. The painting has warm tones, which reduce the sea's apparent menacing overtones and a chance for the people to survive seems plausible. This painting shows the destructive side, and beauty of nature.

Ivan Aivazovsky (Russian: Ива́н Константи́нович Айвазо́вский, Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի Hovhannes Ayvazovski; 29 July 1817 – 2 May 1900) was a Russian Romantic painter. He is considered one of the greatest marine artists in history. Baptized as Hovhannes Aivazian, Aivazovsky was born into an Armenian family in the Black Sea port of Feodosia and was mostly based in his native Crimea.

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The Ninth Wave ( Russian : Девятый вал , Dyevyatiy val ) is an 1850 painting by the Russian Armenian marine painter Ivan Aivazovsky . It is his best known work. [1] [2]

The title refers to an old sailing expression referring to a wave of incredible size that comes after a succession of incrementally larger waves. [3]

It depicts a sea after a night storm and people facing death attempting to save themselves by clinging to debris from a wrecked ship. The debris, in the shape of the cross, appears to be a Christian metaphor for salvation from the earthly sin. The painting has warm tones, which reduce the sea's apparent menacing overtones and a chance for the people to survive seems plausible. This painting shows the destructive side, and beauty of nature.

Ivan Aivazovsky was a famous Russian artist specializing in seascape and landscape portraits. He was born into the family of a destitute Armenian merchant in the Crimean city of Feodosia on 17 July 1817. At the time of Aivazovsky’s birth the city was devastated after a recent war and was still suffering from the consequences of a plague epidemic that had affected the region in 1812.

Aivazovsky’s childhood was spent in poverty on the outskirts of the city facing the beautiful Feodosia Bay and the ruins of an ancient Greek fortress. Young Ivan was mesmerized by the grandeur of the view and the heroic stories told about the Greeks and the famous battles of the past.

His talent was discovered at a very early age. He was taken on as an apprentice by a local architect and later sent to a gymnasium in Simferopol where he showed such amazing artistic skills that influential locals helped him

We strive to provide you with the fairest price for your authenticated Aivazovsky painting, and promise a very quick turnaround for any transaction.

We are always in the market for AUTHENTIC Aivazovsky paintings.
If you own an Aivazovsky painting, or know of someone who does, and is willing to sell us, please let us know. We are extremely knowledgeable and will offer the best market value for your painting once we authenticate it. ...CONTACT US...

Hello to everyone! I’m glad that so many of you have written to me. I just want to express my gratitude and to say I’m thankful that you find my posts interesting. Ivan Aivazovsky was one of my favorite painters, since my childhood. My grandparents had a reproduction of one of his paintings – The Ninth Wave. Every time when I looked at this painting I felt peace and love, so with this post, I hope you’ll fill it too.

The title refers to the nautical tradition that waves grow larger and larger in a series up to the largest wave, the ninth wave, at which point the series starts again. It depicts a sea after a night storm and people facing death attempting to save themselves by clinging to debris from a wrecked ship. The painting has warm tones, which reduce the sea’s apparent menacing overtones and a chance for the people to survive seems plausible. This painting shows the destructive side and beauty of nature.

Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky (Russian:  Ива́н Константи́нович Айвазо́вский , Armenian:  Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի Hovhannes Ayvazovski ;[a] 29 July 1817 – 2 May 1900) was a Russian Romantic painter. He is considered one of the greatest marine artists in history. Baptized as Hovhannes Aivazian, Aivazovsky was born into an Armenian family in the Black Sea port of Feodosia and was mostly based in his native Crimea.

Ivan Aivazovsky (Russian: Ива́н Константи́нович Айвазо́вский, Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի Hovhannes Ayvazovski; 29 July 1817 – 2 May 1900) was a Russian Romantic painter. He is considered one of the greatest marine artists in history. Baptized as Hovhannes Aivazian, Aivazovsky was born into an Armenian family in the Black Sea port of Feodosia and was mostly based in his native Crimea.

Your account is not active. We have sent an email to the address you provided with an activation link. Check your inbox, and click on the link to activate your account.

The Ninth Wave ( Russian : Девятый вал , Dyevyatiy val ) is an 1850 painting by the Russian Armenian marine painter Ivan Aivazovsky . It is his best known work. [1] [2]

The title refers to an old sailing expression referring to a wave of incredible size that comes after a succession of incrementally larger waves. [3]

It depicts a sea after a night storm and people facing death attempting to save themselves by clinging to debris from a wrecked ship. The debris, in the shape of the cross, appears to be a Christian metaphor for salvation from the earthly sin. The painting has warm tones, which reduce the sea's apparent menacing overtones and a chance for the people to survive seems plausible. This painting shows the destructive side, and beauty of nature.

Ivan Aivazovsky was a famous Russian artist specializing in seascape and landscape portraits. He was born into the family of a destitute Armenian merchant in the Crimean city of Feodosia on 17 July 1817. At the time of Aivazovsky’s birth the city was devastated after a recent war and was still suffering from the consequences of a plague epidemic that had affected the region in 1812.

Aivazovsky’s childhood was spent in poverty on the outskirts of the city facing the beautiful Feodosia Bay and the ruins of an ancient Greek fortress. Young Ivan was mesmerized by the grandeur of the view and the heroic stories told about the Greeks and the famous battles of the past.

His talent was discovered at a very early age. He was taken on as an apprentice by a local architect and later sent to a gymnasium in Simferopol where he showed such amazing artistic skills that influential locals helped him

We strive to provide you with the fairest price for your authenticated Aivazovsky painting, and promise a very quick turnaround for any transaction.

We are always in the market for AUTHENTIC Aivazovsky paintings.
If you own an Aivazovsky painting, or know of someone who does, and is willing to sell us, please let us know. We are extremely knowledgeable and will offer the best market value for your painting once we authenticate it. ...CONTACT US...

Ivan Aivazovsky (Russian: Ива́н Константи́нович Айвазо́вский, Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի Hovhannes Ayvazovski; 29 July 1817 – 2 May 1900) was a Russian Romantic painter. He is considered one of the greatest marine artists in history. Baptized as Hovhannes Aivazian, Aivazovsky was born into an Armenian family in the Black Sea port of Feodosia and was mostly based in his native Crimea.

Your account is not active. We have sent an email to the address you provided with an activation link. Check your inbox, and click on the link to activate your account.

Ivan Aivazovsky (Russian: Ива́н Константи́нович Айвазо́вский, Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի Hovhannes Ayvazovski; 29 July 1817 – 2 May 1900) was a Russian Romantic painter. He is considered one of the greatest marine artists in history. Baptized as Hovhannes Aivazian, Aivazovsky was born into an Armenian family in the Black Sea port of Feodosia and was mostly based in his native Crimea.

Your account is not active. We have sent an email to the address you provided with an activation link. Check your inbox, and click on the link to activate your account.

The Ninth Wave ( Russian : Девятый вал , Dyevyatiy val ) is an 1850 painting by the Russian Armenian marine painter Ivan Aivazovsky . It is his best known work. [1] [2]

The title refers to an old sailing expression referring to a wave of incredible size that comes after a succession of incrementally larger waves. [3]

It depicts a sea after a night storm and people facing death attempting to save themselves by clinging to debris from a wrecked ship. The debris, in the shape of the cross, appears to be a Christian metaphor for salvation from the earthly sin. The painting has warm tones, which reduce the sea's apparent menacing overtones and a chance for the people to survive seems plausible. This painting shows the destructive side, and beauty of nature.

Ivan Aivazovsky was a famous Russian artist specializing in seascape and landscape portraits. He was born into the family of a destitute Armenian merchant in the Crimean city of Feodosia on 17 July 1817. At the time of Aivazovsky’s birth the city was devastated after a recent war and was still suffering from the consequences of a plague epidemic that had affected the region in 1812.

Aivazovsky’s childhood was spent in poverty on the outskirts of the city facing the beautiful Feodosia Bay and the ruins of an ancient Greek fortress. Young Ivan was mesmerized by the grandeur of the view and the heroic stories told about the Greeks and the famous battles of the past.

His talent was discovered at a very early age. He was taken on as an apprentice by a local architect and later sent to a gymnasium in Simferopol where he showed such amazing artistic skills that influential locals helped him

Ivan Aivazovsky (Russian: Ива́н Константи́нович Айвазо́вский, Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի Hovhannes Ayvazovski; 29 July 1817 – 2 May 1900) was a Russian Romantic painter. He is considered one of the greatest marine artists in history. Baptized as Hovhannes Aivazian, Aivazovsky was born into an Armenian family in the Black Sea port of Feodosia and was mostly based in his native Crimea.


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