WEFOUNDthe keepers netflix


There were a lot of things for true crime junkies to get excited about when Netflix released the teaser for its new series “The Keepers” : an unsolved murder, a missing nun, corruption, a possible Catholic school cover-up.

For all its promises, the series — from documentary veteran Ryan White, who also directed “The Case Against 8” and “Good Ol’ Freda” — delivers. The seven episodes, which build upon HuffPost’s own investigation into this particular case , center around the 1969 disappearance and death of Sister Cathy Cesnik, a young nun who taught English at a Baltimore-area Catholic high school and was beloved by students. Two months after Cesnik failed to return home from a routine shopping trip, her body was found by hunters in a remote wooded area five miles from her apartment. Investigations revealed she had suffered a mortal wound to her head. Her killer was never found.

“The Keepers” is as addictive and compelling as “ Making a Murderer ,” the documentary series that ran on the streaming network in late 2015, spurring theories, sprawling message board discussions and an acute hunger for more true crime stories. (The docuseries are entirely different, of course, but comparisons will be inevitable.)

There were a lot of things for true crime junkies to get excited about when Netflix released the teaser for its new series “The Keepers” : an unsolved murder, a missing nun, corruption, a possible Catholic school cover-up.

For all its promises, the series — from documentary veteran Ryan White, who also directed “The Case Against 8” and “Good Ol’ Freda” — delivers. The seven episodes, which build upon HuffPost’s own investigation into this particular case , center around the 1969 disappearance and death of Sister Cathy Cesnik, a young nun who taught English at a Baltimore-area Catholic high school and was beloved by students. Two months after Cesnik failed to return home from a routine shopping trip, her body was found by hunters in a remote wooded area five miles from her apartment. Investigations revealed she had suffered a mortal wound to her head. Her killer was never found.

“The Keepers” is as addictive and compelling as “ Making a Murderer ,” the documentary series that ran on the streaming network in late 2015, spurring theories, sprawling message board discussions and an acute hunger for more true crime stories. (The docuseries are entirely different, of course, but comparisons will be inevitable.)

Netflix’s new documentary series about the still-unsolved murder of Sister Catherine Cesnik in 1970 bears the name “The Keepers” — but what does the title mean?

“The Keepers” director Ryan White told TheWrap that the title actually came from a conversation between Jean Wehner, who is one of the victims in the documentary to come forward and accuse Father Joseph Maskell of sexually abusing her during her high school years, and one of her friends.

“Jean said, ‘We are the keepers of the secrets,’ and I knew that had to be the title,” White said. “Obviously, it has other meanings — one other meaning was the idea of gatekeepers. The theory that people in position of authority and power are able to decide what we as the populous know or don’t know or whether survivors of abuse are validated or not… I also liked the institutional meaning of ‘The Keepers.'”

Full of twists and revelations, the new Netflix series meticulously examines the cold case of a nun killed in Baltimore in 1969 – and it’s so much more than just the new Making a Murderer

Why you’ll love it: The Keepers is not the new Making a Murderer . Without looking it up, tell me the name of the victim, the dead woman whose family still mourn her sudden loss, in Making a Murderer. The Keepers is a story about victims and their search for justice. It’s about giving them a chance to be heard over the loud denials of any and every official body.

It is beautifully shot, scored by a composer determined to demonstrate his command of emotive strings, and features an unsolved crime. But there the similarities ends. Director Ryan White began work on this long before the success of Making a Murderer and has dedicated himself to telling as many stories as he can, not just one.

There were a lot of things for true crime junkies to get excited about when Netflix released the teaser for its new series “The Keepers” : an unsolved murder, a missing nun, corruption, a possible Catholic school cover-up.

For all its promises, the series — from documentary veteran Ryan White, who also directed “The Case Against 8” and “Good Ol’ Freda” — delivers. The seven episodes, which build upon HuffPost’s own investigation into this particular case , center around the 1969 disappearance and death of Sister Cathy Cesnik, a young nun who taught English at a Baltimore-area Catholic high school and was beloved by students. Two months after Cesnik failed to return home from a routine shopping trip, her body was found by hunters in a remote wooded area five miles from her apartment. Investigations revealed she had suffered a mortal wound to her head. Her killer was never found.

“The Keepers” is as addictive and compelling as “ Making a Murderer ,” the documentary series that ran on the streaming network in late 2015, spurring theories, sprawling message board discussions and an acute hunger for more true crime stories. (The docuseries are entirely different, of course, but comparisons will be inevitable.)

Netflix’s new documentary series about the still-unsolved murder of Sister Catherine Cesnik in 1970 bears the name “The Keepers” — but what does the title mean?

“The Keepers” director Ryan White told TheWrap that the title actually came from a conversation between Jean Wehner, who is one of the victims in the documentary to come forward and accuse Father Joseph Maskell of sexually abusing her during her high school years, and one of her friends.

“Jean said, ‘We are the keepers of the secrets,’ and I knew that had to be the title,” White said. “Obviously, it has other meanings — one other meaning was the idea of gatekeepers. The theory that people in position of authority and power are able to decide what we as the populous know or don’t know or whether survivors of abuse are validated or not… I also liked the institutional meaning of ‘The Keepers.'”


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