WEFOUNDspiky planet anglais


Itchy-rash plants are the plant kingdom's answer to yellow jackets, mosquitoes, and the like. As if it were not bad enough that you have to watch out for the burning sting that yellow jackets can inflict while you are going about your business in the yard, there is a weed (stinging nettle) that can also burn you and cause itching. And while those who fail to practice mosquito control are doomed to suffer itchy stings, we all know the skin rashes caused by poison ivy are no picnic, either.

What you may not know is that you can also come down with an itchy rash from contact with lesser-known noxious weeds  that commonly grow in the yard.

Yes, there is a skin rash just waiting to happen when you step out into your yard. Learn to identify the plants in question. Once you know what they look like, you can eradicate them (or, at least, avoid them). 

Cacti and succulents are some of the most popular and charismatic plants appearing in private collections the world over—perhaps even as part of your own. Their unexpectedly beautiful blooms and quirky, characterful shapes and textures have made them a firm horticultural favourite.

Succulents are found across the globe in nearly all types of habitat, but most often in arid or semi-arid parts of the world. They’re specially adapted to deal with dry, desert-like conditions, and able to store water in one or more of their organs; their leaves, stems, or roots are often filled with water-storing tissue, and are thus unusually fleshy and enlarged. Succulent families include aloe, agave, and, most famously, cacti (the Cactaceae family). While most all cacti are succulents, not all succulents are cacti; cacti are distinct because of the small round nodules seen speckled across the plant (known as areoles ) from which they grow and produce flowers and spines.

Our love for cacti has its downsides. These plants are suffering because of their horticultural desirability, which has led to them being illegally collected and traded internationally. Aesthetic appeal aside, many cultures enjoy these spiky species for their economic, societal, and ecological significance worldwide; they are used as sources of food for humans and animals, for shelter and construction materials, and in the production of traditional medicines, drugs, oils, and cosmetics.

We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.

Itchy-rash plants are the plant kingdom's answer to yellow jackets, mosquitoes, and the like. As if it were not bad enough that you have to watch out for the burning sting that yellow jackets can inflict while you are going about your business in the yard, there is a weed (stinging nettle) that can also burn you and cause itching. And while those who fail to practice mosquito control are doomed to suffer itchy stings, we all know the skin rashes caused by poison ivy are no picnic, either.

What you may not know is that you can also come down with an itchy rash from contact with lesser-known noxious weeds  that commonly grow in the yard.

Yes, there is a skin rash just waiting to happen when you step out into your yard. Learn to identify the plants in question. Once you know what they look like, you can eradicate them (or, at least, avoid them). 

Cacti and succulents are some of the most popular and charismatic plants appearing in private collections the world over—perhaps even as part of your own. Their unexpectedly beautiful blooms and quirky, characterful shapes and textures have made them a firm horticultural favourite.

Succulents are found across the globe in nearly all types of habitat, but most often in arid or semi-arid parts of the world. They’re specially adapted to deal with dry, desert-like conditions, and able to store water in one or more of their organs; their leaves, stems, or roots are often filled with water-storing tissue, and are thus unusually fleshy and enlarged. Succulent families include aloe, agave, and, most famously, cacti (the Cactaceae family). While most all cacti are succulents, not all succulents are cacti; cacti are distinct because of the small round nodules seen speckled across the plant (known as areoles ) from which they grow and produce flowers and spines.

Our love for cacti has its downsides. These plants are suffering because of their horticultural desirability, which has led to them being illegally collected and traded internationally. Aesthetic appeal aside, many cultures enjoy these spiky species for their economic, societal, and ecological significance worldwide; they are used as sources of food for humans and animals, for shelter and construction materials, and in the production of traditional medicines, drugs, oils, and cosmetics.

We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.

The Pokémon Company International is not responsible for the content of any linked website that is not operated by The Pokémon Company International. Please note that these websites' privacy policies and security practices may differ from The Pokémon Company International's standards.

Itchy-rash plants are the plant kingdom's answer to yellow jackets, mosquitoes, and the like. As if it were not bad enough that you have to watch out for the burning sting that yellow jackets can inflict while you are going about your business in the yard, there is a weed (stinging nettle) that can also burn you and cause itching. And while those who fail to practice mosquito control are doomed to suffer itchy stings, we all know the skin rashes caused by poison ivy are no picnic, either.

What you may not know is that you can also come down with an itchy rash from contact with lesser-known noxious weeds  that commonly grow in the yard.

Yes, there is a skin rash just waiting to happen when you step out into your yard. Learn to identify the plants in question. Once you know what they look like, you can eradicate them (or, at least, avoid them). 

Cacti and succulents are some of the most popular and charismatic plants appearing in private collections the world over—perhaps even as part of your own. Their unexpectedly beautiful blooms and quirky, characterful shapes and textures have made them a firm horticultural favourite.

Succulents are found across the globe in nearly all types of habitat, but most often in arid or semi-arid parts of the world. They’re specially adapted to deal with dry, desert-like conditions, and able to store water in one or more of their organs; their leaves, stems, or roots are often filled with water-storing tissue, and are thus unusually fleshy and enlarged. Succulent families include aloe, agave, and, most famously, cacti (the Cactaceae family). While most all cacti are succulents, not all succulents are cacti; cacti are distinct because of the small round nodules seen speckled across the plant (known as areoles ) from which they grow and produce flowers and spines.

Our love for cacti has its downsides. These plants are suffering because of their horticultural desirability, which has led to them being illegally collected and traded internationally. Aesthetic appeal aside, many cultures enjoy these spiky species for their economic, societal, and ecological significance worldwide; they are used as sources of food for humans and animals, for shelter and construction materials, and in the production of traditional medicines, drugs, oils, and cosmetics.

We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.

The Pokémon Company International is not responsible for the content of any linked website that is not operated by The Pokémon Company International. Please note that these websites' privacy policies and security practices may differ from The Pokémon Company International's standards.

That's right! The Paleofuture blog has moved to Gizmodo ! You can check out new posts (along with the complete archive dating back to 2007) at paleofuture.gizmodo.com !

I started the Paleofuture blog in 2007 as part of a writing class I was taking at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. At the time I thought that I'd maybe keep it up for just a couple of months. Little did I realize that writing about the history of the future would become such a huge part of my life.

Today, it's with great pride that I can announce the little ol' Paleofuture blog is becoming a part of the Smithsonian family of blogs ! The new web address is http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/paleofuture/ and that's where you'll be able to find new blog posts. But don't worry, Paleofuture.com will remain intact, as an archive of the last five years and the place to find new episodes of Paleofuture.TV and new issues of  Paleofuture Magazine .

Itchy-rash plants are the plant kingdom's answer to yellow jackets, mosquitoes, and the like. As if it were not bad enough that you have to watch out for the burning sting that yellow jackets can inflict while you are going about your business in the yard, there is a weed (stinging nettle) that can also burn you and cause itching. And while those who fail to practice mosquito control are doomed to suffer itchy stings, we all know the skin rashes caused by poison ivy are no picnic, either.

What you may not know is that you can also come down with an itchy rash from contact with lesser-known noxious weeds  that commonly grow in the yard.

Yes, there is a skin rash just waiting to happen when you step out into your yard. Learn to identify the plants in question. Once you know what they look like, you can eradicate them (or, at least, avoid them). 

Itchy-rash plants are the plant kingdom's answer to yellow jackets, mosquitoes, and the like. As if it were not bad enough that you have to watch out for the burning sting that yellow jackets can inflict while you are going about your business in the yard, there is a weed (stinging nettle) that can also burn you and cause itching. And while those who fail to practice mosquito control are doomed to suffer itchy stings, we all know the skin rashes caused by poison ivy are no picnic, either.

What you may not know is that you can also come down with an itchy rash from contact with lesser-known noxious weeds  that commonly grow in the yard.

Yes, there is a skin rash just waiting to happen when you step out into your yard. Learn to identify the plants in question. Once you know what they look like, you can eradicate them (or, at least, avoid them). 

Cacti and succulents are some of the most popular and charismatic plants appearing in private collections the world over—perhaps even as part of your own. Their unexpectedly beautiful blooms and quirky, characterful shapes and textures have made them a firm horticultural favourite.

Succulents are found across the globe in nearly all types of habitat, but most often in arid or semi-arid parts of the world. They’re specially adapted to deal with dry, desert-like conditions, and able to store water in one or more of their organs; their leaves, stems, or roots are often filled with water-storing tissue, and are thus unusually fleshy and enlarged. Succulent families include aloe, agave, and, most famously, cacti (the Cactaceae family). While most all cacti are succulents, not all succulents are cacti; cacti are distinct because of the small round nodules seen speckled across the plant (known as areoles ) from which they grow and produce flowers and spines.

Our love for cacti has its downsides. These plants are suffering because of their horticultural desirability, which has led to them being illegally collected and traded internationally. Aesthetic appeal aside, many cultures enjoy these spiky species for their economic, societal, and ecological significance worldwide; they are used as sources of food for humans and animals, for shelter and construction materials, and in the production of traditional medicines, drugs, oils, and cosmetics.


81BzkjQqHyL