WEFOUNDunder the sunset film


Half of a Yellow Sun (15 cert, 111 min). Directed by Biyi Bandele. Starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Thandie Newton, Onyeka Onwenu, Genevieve Nnaji and OC Ukeje.

There are reasons to warm to Half of a Yellow Sun, rookie writer-director Biyi Bandele’s adaptation of the Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie novel. Adichie’s Orange Prize-winning tale of love and loss, unfolding against the backdrop of a Nigeria caught between independence and civil war, has inspired one of the British film industry’s few recent engagements with the nation’s colonial legacy. What’s more, while streamlining the author’s fragmented narrative, Bandele has taken care to preserve the feminist thrust that sees heroine Olanna (a glowing Thandie Newton) pass from carefree society belle to reluctant domesticity.

Indeed, behind Newton and an impressively forthright Anika Noni Rose as Olanna’s liberated sister Kainene, the men are somewhat eclipsed. As Odenigbo, the womanising intellectual Olanna tumbles for, the newly prominent Chiwetel Ejiofor functions almost as a satellite to the main action, while Joseph Mawle’s weak-willed reporter Richard is forgotten for long stretches. Familiar problems of adaptation soon make themselves apparent: where the book was expansive in its reach, Bandele’s film makes for a rather cramped two hours. Worse, it sometimes appears naggingly detached from the upheavals it is attempting to portray.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

The epitome of what a feel-good movie is supposed to be but rarely is, this one is beautiful to look at and life-affirming to think about, and it doesn't have a pretentious bone in its head.

Soon as I saw a shot of the building’s rear during the powder puff football game, I thought “huh. That looks like it was built around 1925.” (The construction is the dead spit of my own high school, built in 1926.) So I go to Wikipedia to see how close I got, and …

I remember seeing this film back in 1970.
We had an assembly in the auditorium where the film was shown to the students.
I’ve asked others from my class about this film and if they knew whatever became of it.
Many from my class don’t even remember this film…
So glad to see it up and running!!!
Boy…Those were the days!!!
God Bless America!!!

[…] since. The 22-minute film, shot in 1973 by SMU film student Blaine Dunlap (who also made the fun 1970 Sunset High School film I wrote about earlier this year) shows Dallas Public Works Dept. street flusher Stanley Maupin at […]

Under the Tuscan Sun is a 2003 American romantic comedy drama film written, produced, and directed by Audrey Wells and starring Diane Lane . Based on Frances Mayes ' 1996 memoir of the same name , the film is about a recently divorced writer who buys a villa in Tuscany on a whim, hoping it will lead to a change in her life. [2] The film was nominated for the Art Directors Guild Excellence in Production Design Award, and for her performance in the film, Diane Lane received a Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Performance by an Actress. [3]

Frances Mayes ( Diane Lane ) is a San Francisco writer whose seemingly perfect life takes an unexpected turn when she learns that her husband has been cheating on her. The divorce—and the loss of her house to her ex-husband and his much-younger, pregnant new partner—leaves her depressed and unable to write. Her best friend Patti ( Sandra Oh ), a lesbian who is expecting a child, is beginning to think Frances might never recover. She urges Frances to take an Italian vacation to Tuscany using the ticket she purchased before she became pregnant. At first Frances refuses, but after another depressing day in her gloomy apartment, she decides that it's a good idea to get away for a while.

In Tuscany, her tour group stops in the small town of Cortona . After wandering through the charming streets, she notices a posting for a villa for sale in Cortona. She rejoins her tour group on the bus, and just outside town, the bus stops to allow a flock of sheep to cross the road. While they wait, Frances realizes that they've stopped directly in front of the very villa that she had seen for sale—something she believes is a sign. She asks the driver to stop and she gets off the bus. Through a series of serendipitous events, she becomes the owner of a lovely yet dilapidated villa in beautiful Tuscany.

Half of a Yellow Sun (15 cert, 111 min). Directed by Biyi Bandele. Starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Thandie Newton, Onyeka Onwenu, Genevieve Nnaji and OC Ukeje.

There are reasons to warm to Half of a Yellow Sun, rookie writer-director Biyi Bandele’s adaptation of the Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie novel. Adichie’s Orange Prize-winning tale of love and loss, unfolding against the backdrop of a Nigeria caught between independence and civil war, has inspired one of the British film industry’s few recent engagements with the nation’s colonial legacy. What’s more, while streamlining the author’s fragmented narrative, Bandele has taken care to preserve the feminist thrust that sees heroine Olanna (a glowing Thandie Newton) pass from carefree society belle to reluctant domesticity.

Indeed, behind Newton and an impressively forthright Anika Noni Rose as Olanna’s liberated sister Kainene, the men are somewhat eclipsed. As Odenigbo, the womanising intellectual Olanna tumbles for, the newly prominent Chiwetel Ejiofor functions almost as a satellite to the main action, while Joseph Mawle’s weak-willed reporter Richard is forgotten for long stretches. Familiar problems of adaptation soon make themselves apparent: where the book was expansive in its reach, Bandele’s film makes for a rather cramped two hours. Worse, it sometimes appears naggingly detached from the upheavals it is attempting to portray.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

The epitome of what a feel-good movie is supposed to be but rarely is, this one is beautiful to look at and life-affirming to think about, and it doesn't have a pretentious bone in its head.

Half of a Yellow Sun (15 cert, 111 min). Directed by Biyi Bandele. Starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Thandie Newton, Onyeka Onwenu, Genevieve Nnaji and OC Ukeje.

There are reasons to warm to Half of a Yellow Sun, rookie writer-director Biyi Bandele’s adaptation of the Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie novel. Adichie’s Orange Prize-winning tale of love and loss, unfolding against the backdrop of a Nigeria caught between independence and civil war, has inspired one of the British film industry’s few recent engagements with the nation’s colonial legacy. What’s more, while streamlining the author’s fragmented narrative, Bandele has taken care to preserve the feminist thrust that sees heroine Olanna (a glowing Thandie Newton) pass from carefree society belle to reluctant domesticity.

Indeed, behind Newton and an impressively forthright Anika Noni Rose as Olanna’s liberated sister Kainene, the men are somewhat eclipsed. As Odenigbo, the womanising intellectual Olanna tumbles for, the newly prominent Chiwetel Ejiofor functions almost as a satellite to the main action, while Joseph Mawle’s weak-willed reporter Richard is forgotten for long stretches. Familiar problems of adaptation soon make themselves apparent: where the book was expansive in its reach, Bandele’s film makes for a rather cramped two hours. Worse, it sometimes appears naggingly detached from the upheavals it is attempting to portray.

Half of a Yellow Sun (15 cert, 111 min). Directed by Biyi Bandele. Starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Thandie Newton, Onyeka Onwenu, Genevieve Nnaji and OC Ukeje.

There are reasons to warm to Half of a Yellow Sun, rookie writer-director Biyi Bandele’s adaptation of the Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie novel. Adichie’s Orange Prize-winning tale of love and loss, unfolding against the backdrop of a Nigeria caught between independence and civil war, has inspired one of the British film industry’s few recent engagements with the nation’s colonial legacy. What’s more, while streamlining the author’s fragmented narrative, Bandele has taken care to preserve the feminist thrust that sees heroine Olanna (a glowing Thandie Newton) pass from carefree society belle to reluctant domesticity.

Indeed, behind Newton and an impressively forthright Anika Noni Rose as Olanna’s liberated sister Kainene, the men are somewhat eclipsed. As Odenigbo, the womanising intellectual Olanna tumbles for, the newly prominent Chiwetel Ejiofor functions almost as a satellite to the main action, while Joseph Mawle’s weak-willed reporter Richard is forgotten for long stretches. Familiar problems of adaptation soon make themselves apparent: where the book was expansive in its reach, Bandele’s film makes for a rather cramped two hours. Worse, it sometimes appears naggingly detached from the upheavals it is attempting to portray.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

The epitome of what a feel-good movie is supposed to be but rarely is, this one is beautiful to look at and life-affirming to think about, and it doesn't have a pretentious bone in its head.

Soon as I saw a shot of the building’s rear during the powder puff football game, I thought “huh. That looks like it was built around 1925.” (The construction is the dead spit of my own high school, built in 1926.) So I go to Wikipedia to see how close I got, and …

I remember seeing this film back in 1970.
We had an assembly in the auditorium where the film was shown to the students.
I’ve asked others from my class about this film and if they knew whatever became of it.
Many from my class don’t even remember this film…
So glad to see it up and running!!!
Boy…Those were the days!!!
God Bless America!!!

[…] since. The 22-minute film, shot in 1973 by SMU film student Blaine Dunlap (who also made the fun 1970 Sunset High School film I wrote about earlier this year) shows Dallas Public Works Dept. street flusher Stanley Maupin at […]


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