WEFOUNDthe eustace diamonds plot summary


The Eustace Diamonds is a novel by Anthony Trollope , first published in 1871 as a serial in the Fortnightly Review . It is the third of the " Palliser " series of novels. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

In this novel, the characters of Plantagenet Palliser , his wife Lady Glencora and their uncle the ailing Duke of Omnium are in the background. The plot centres on Lizzie Greystock, a fortune-hunter who ensnares the sickly, dissipated Sir Florian Eustace and is soon left a very wealthy widow and mother. While clever and beautiful, Lizzie has several character flaws; the greatest of these is an almost pathological delight in lying, even when it cannot benefit her. (Trollope comments that Lizzie sees lies as "more beautiful than the truth.") Before he dies, the disillusioned Sir Florian discovers all this, but does not think to change the generous terms of his will. [7]

The diamonds of the book's title are a necklace, a family heirloom that Sir Florian gave to Lizzie to wear. Though they belong to her husband's estate (and thus eventually will be the property of her son), Lizzie refuses to relinquish them. She lies about the terms under which they were given to her, leaving their ownership unclear. The indignant Eustace family lawyer, Mr Camperdown, strives to retrieve the necklace, putting the Eustaces in an awkward position. On the one hand, the diamonds are valuable and Lizzie may not have a legal claim to them, but on the other, they do not want to antagonise the mother of the heir to the family estate (Lizzie having only a life interest ).

“She is married today, duke, down in Scotland,” said Lady Glencora, sitting close to the duke’s ear, for the duke was a little deaf. They were in the duke’s small morning sitting-room, and no one else was present excepting Madame Max Goesler.

“Married tomorrow down in Scotland. Dear, dear! what is he?” The profession to which Mr. Emilius belonged had been mentioned to the duke more than once before.

“A clergyman of our Church; dear, dear! And married in Scotland! That makes it stranger. I wonder what made a clergyman marry her?”

We read this novel in the 19th Century Lit group. You might be entertained by reading some of the posts. It was the first Trollope I had read, and I liked it quite a bit. I’m hoping to get to others one of these days. Right now, I’m working my way through the Dicken’s oeuvre.

This is next for me in the Palliser books. I’m sorry to hear it’s so disappointing! I heard it was a “mystery” of sorts and I don’t like mysteries but hoped it would be a good one. Too bad it doesn’t work well. 🙁

Hello Rebecca. Don’t let me put you off! Lots of people love it, and I can be notoriously picky. I’m looking forward to hearing your thoughts.

The Eustace Diamonds is a novel by Anthony Trollope , first published in 1871 as a serial in the Fortnightly Review . It is the third of the " Palliser " series of novels. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

In this novel, the characters of Plantagenet Palliser , his wife Lady Glencora and their uncle the ailing Duke of Omnium are in the background. The plot centres on Lizzie Greystock, a fortune-hunter who ensnares the sickly, dissipated Sir Florian Eustace and is soon left a very wealthy widow and mother. While clever and beautiful, Lizzie has several character flaws; the greatest of these is an almost pathological delight in lying, even when it cannot benefit her. (Trollope comments that Lizzie sees lies as "more beautiful than the truth.") Before he dies, the disillusioned Sir Florian discovers all this, but does not think to change the generous terms of his will. [7]

The diamonds of the book's title are a necklace, a family heirloom that Sir Florian gave to Lizzie to wear. Though they belong to her husband's estate (and thus eventually will be the property of her son), Lizzie refuses to relinquish them. She lies about the terms under which they were given to her, leaving their ownership unclear. The indignant Eustace family lawyer, Mr Camperdown, strives to retrieve the necklace, putting the Eustaces in an awkward position. On the one hand, the diamonds are valuable and Lizzie may not have a legal claim to them, but on the other, they do not want to antagonise the mother of the heir to the family estate (Lizzie having only a life interest ).

“She is married today, duke, down in Scotland,” said Lady Glencora, sitting close to the duke’s ear, for the duke was a little deaf. They were in the duke’s small morning sitting-room, and no one else was present excepting Madame Max Goesler.

“Married tomorrow down in Scotland. Dear, dear! what is he?” The profession to which Mr. Emilius belonged had been mentioned to the duke more than once before.

“A clergyman of our Church; dear, dear! And married in Scotland! That makes it stranger. I wonder what made a clergyman marry her?”

We read this novel in the 19th Century Lit group. You might be entertained by reading some of the posts. It was the first Trollope I had read, and I liked it quite a bit. I’m hoping to get to others one of these days. Right now, I’m working my way through the Dicken’s oeuvre.

This is next for me in the Palliser books. I’m sorry to hear it’s so disappointing! I heard it was a “mystery” of sorts and I don’t like mysteries but hoped it would be a good one. Too bad it doesn’t work well. 🙁

Hello Rebecca. Don’t let me put you off! Lots of people love it, and I can be notoriously picky. I’m looking forward to hearing your thoughts.

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps: 1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com 2. Copy the web address of the product 3. Click Insert product link 4. Paste the web address in the box 5. Click Select 6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854X Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]] 7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like so: Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps: 1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com 2. Copy the web address of the product 3. Click Insert product link 4. Paste the web address in the box 5. Click Select 6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854X Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]] 7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like so: Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps: 1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com 2. Copy the web address of the product 3. Click Insert product link 4. Paste the web address in the box 5. Click Select 6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854X Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]] 7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like so: Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

Престиж (2006)
# 48 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Amy Adams »
# 123 on STARmeter

It looks like we don't have any Plot Summaries for this title yet.
Be the first to contribute! Just click the "Edit page" button at the bottom of the page or learn more in the Plot Summary submission guide .

The Eustace Diamonds is a novel by Anthony Trollope , first published in 1871 as a serial in the Fortnightly Review . It is the third of the " Palliser " series of novels. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

In this novel, the characters of Plantagenet Palliser , his wife Lady Glencora and their uncle the ailing Duke of Omnium are in the background. The plot centres on Lizzie Greystock, a fortune-hunter who ensnares the sickly, dissipated Sir Florian Eustace and is soon left a very wealthy widow and mother. While clever and beautiful, Lizzie has several character flaws; the greatest of these is an almost pathological delight in lying, even when it cannot benefit her. (Trollope comments that Lizzie sees lies as "more beautiful than the truth.") Before he dies, the disillusioned Sir Florian discovers all this, but does not think to change the generous terms of his will. [7]

The diamonds of the book's title are a necklace, a family heirloom that Sir Florian gave to Lizzie to wear. Though they belong to her husband's estate (and thus eventually will be the property of her son), Lizzie refuses to relinquish them. She lies about the terms under which they were given to her, leaving their ownership unclear. The indignant Eustace family lawyer, Mr Camperdown, strives to retrieve the necklace, putting the Eustaces in an awkward position. On the one hand, the diamonds are valuable and Lizzie may not have a legal claim to them, but on the other, they do not want to antagonise the mother of the heir to the family estate (Lizzie having only a life interest ).

“She is married today, duke, down in Scotland,” said Lady Glencora, sitting close to the duke’s ear, for the duke was a little deaf. They were in the duke’s small morning sitting-room, and no one else was present excepting Madame Max Goesler.

“Married tomorrow down in Scotland. Dear, dear! what is he?” The profession to which Mr. Emilius belonged had been mentioned to the duke more than once before.

“A clergyman of our Church; dear, dear! And married in Scotland! That makes it stranger. I wonder what made a clergyman marry her?”

We read this novel in the 19th Century Lit group. You might be entertained by reading some of the posts. It was the first Trollope I had read, and I liked it quite a bit. I’m hoping to get to others one of these days. Right now, I’m working my way through the Dicken’s oeuvre.

This is next for me in the Palliser books. I’m sorry to hear it’s so disappointing! I heard it was a “mystery” of sorts and I don’t like mysteries but hoped it would be a good one. Too bad it doesn’t work well. 🙁

Hello Rebecca. Don’t let me put you off! Lots of people love it, and I can be notoriously picky. I’m looking forward to hearing your thoughts.

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps: 1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com 2. Copy the web address of the product 3. Click Insert product link 4. Paste the web address in the box 5. Click Select 6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854X Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]] 7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like so: Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps: 1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com 2. Copy the web address of the product 3. Click Insert product link 4. Paste the web address in the box 5. Click Select 6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854X Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]] 7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like so: Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps: 1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com 2. Copy the web address of the product 3. Click Insert product link 4. Paste the web address in the box 5. Click Select 6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854X Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]] 7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like so: Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

The Eustace Diamonds is a novel by Anthony Trollope , first published in 1871 as a serial in the Fortnightly Review . It is the third of the " Palliser " series of novels. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

In this novel, the characters of Plantagenet Palliser , his wife Lady Glencora and their uncle the ailing Duke of Omnium are in the background. The plot centres on Lizzie Greystock, a fortune-hunter who ensnares the sickly, dissipated Sir Florian Eustace and is soon left a very wealthy widow and mother. While clever and beautiful, Lizzie has several character flaws; the greatest of these is an almost pathological delight in lying, even when it cannot benefit her. (Trollope comments that Lizzie sees lies as "more beautiful than the truth.") Before he dies, the disillusioned Sir Florian discovers all this, but does not think to change the generous terms of his will. [7]

The diamonds of the book's title are a necklace, a family heirloom that Sir Florian gave to Lizzie to wear. Though they belong to her husband's estate (and thus eventually will be the property of her son), Lizzie refuses to relinquish them. She lies about the terms under which they were given to her, leaving their ownership unclear. The indignant Eustace family lawyer, Mr Camperdown, strives to retrieve the necklace, putting the Eustaces in an awkward position. On the one hand, the diamonds are valuable and Lizzie may not have a legal claim to them, but on the other, they do not want to antagonise the mother of the heir to the family estate (Lizzie having only a life interest ).

The Eustace Diamonds is a novel by Anthony Trollope , first published in 1871 as a serial in the Fortnightly Review . It is the third of the " Palliser " series of novels. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

In this novel, the characters of Plantagenet Palliser , his wife Lady Glencora and their uncle the ailing Duke of Omnium are in the background. The plot centres on Lizzie Greystock, a fortune-hunter who ensnares the sickly, dissipated Sir Florian Eustace and is soon left a very wealthy widow and mother. While clever and beautiful, Lizzie has several character flaws; the greatest of these is an almost pathological delight in lying, even when it cannot benefit her. (Trollope comments that Lizzie sees lies as "more beautiful than the truth.") Before he dies, the disillusioned Sir Florian discovers all this, but does not think to change the generous terms of his will. [7]

The diamonds of the book's title are a necklace, a family heirloom that Sir Florian gave to Lizzie to wear. Though they belong to her husband's estate (and thus eventually will be the property of her son), Lizzie refuses to relinquish them. She lies about the terms under which they were given to her, leaving their ownership unclear. The indignant Eustace family lawyer, Mr Camperdown, strives to retrieve the necklace, putting the Eustaces in an awkward position. On the one hand, the diamonds are valuable and Lizzie may not have a legal claim to them, but on the other, they do not want to antagonise the mother of the heir to the family estate (Lizzie having only a life interest ).

“She is married today, duke, down in Scotland,” said Lady Glencora, sitting close to the duke’s ear, for the duke was a little deaf. They were in the duke’s small morning sitting-room, and no one else was present excepting Madame Max Goesler.

“Married tomorrow down in Scotland. Dear, dear! what is he?” The profession to which Mr. Emilius belonged had been mentioned to the duke more than once before.

“A clergyman of our Church; dear, dear! And married in Scotland! That makes it stranger. I wonder what made a clergyman marry her?”

We read this novel in the 19th Century Lit group. You might be entertained by reading some of the posts. It was the first Trollope I had read, and I liked it quite a bit. I’m hoping to get to others one of these days. Right now, I’m working my way through the Dicken’s oeuvre.

This is next for me in the Palliser books. I’m sorry to hear it’s so disappointing! I heard it was a “mystery” of sorts and I don’t like mysteries but hoped it would be a good one. Too bad it doesn’t work well. 🙁

Hello Rebecca. Don’t let me put you off! Lots of people love it, and I can be notoriously picky. I’m looking forward to hearing your thoughts.

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps: 1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com 2. Copy the web address of the product 3. Click Insert product link 4. Paste the web address in the box 5. Click Select 6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854X Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]] 7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like so: Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps: 1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com 2. Copy the web address of the product 3. Click Insert product link 4. Paste the web address in the box 5. Click Select 6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854X Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]] 7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like so: Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps: 1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com 2. Copy the web address of the product 3. Click Insert product link 4. Paste the web address in the box 5. Click Select 6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854X Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]] 7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like so: Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

Престиж (2006)
# 48 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Amy Adams »
# 123 on STARmeter

It looks like we don't have any Plot Summaries for this title yet.
Be the first to contribute! Just click the "Edit page" button at the bottom of the page or learn more in the Plot Summary submission guide .

Following the death of her husband, Sir Florian, beautiful Lizzie Eustace mysteriously comes into possession of a hugely expensive diamond necklace. She maintains it was a gift from her husband, but the Eustace lawyers insist she give it up, and while her cousin Frank takes her side, her new lover Lord Fawn states that he will only marry her if the necklace is surrendered. As gossip and scandal intensity, Lizzie's truthfulness is thrown into doubt, and, in her desire to keep the jewels, she is driven to increasingly desperate acts. … ( more )

The Eustace Diamonds is a novel by Anthony Trollope , first published in 1871 as a serial in the Fortnightly Review . It is the third of the " Palliser " series of novels. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

In this novel, the characters of Plantagenet Palliser , his wife Lady Glencora and their uncle the ailing Duke of Omnium are in the background. The plot centres on Lizzie Greystock, a fortune-hunter who ensnares the sickly, dissipated Sir Florian Eustace and is soon left a very wealthy widow and mother. While clever and beautiful, Lizzie has several character flaws; the greatest of these is an almost pathological delight in lying, even when it cannot benefit her. (Trollope comments that Lizzie sees lies as "more beautiful than the truth.") Before he dies, the disillusioned Sir Florian discovers all this, but does not think to change the generous terms of his will. [7]

The diamonds of the book's title are a necklace, a family heirloom that Sir Florian gave to Lizzie to wear. Though they belong to her husband's estate (and thus eventually will be the property of her son), Lizzie refuses to relinquish them. She lies about the terms under which they were given to her, leaving their ownership unclear. The indignant Eustace family lawyer, Mr Camperdown, strives to retrieve the necklace, putting the Eustaces in an awkward position. On the one hand, the diamonds are valuable and Lizzie may not have a legal claim to them, but on the other, they do not want to antagonise the mother of the heir to the family estate (Lizzie having only a life interest ).

“She is married today, duke, down in Scotland,” said Lady Glencora, sitting close to the duke’s ear, for the duke was a little deaf. They were in the duke’s small morning sitting-room, and no one else was present excepting Madame Max Goesler.

“Married tomorrow down in Scotland. Dear, dear! what is he?” The profession to which Mr. Emilius belonged had been mentioned to the duke more than once before.

“A clergyman of our Church; dear, dear! And married in Scotland! That makes it stranger. I wonder what made a clergyman marry her?”


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