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Home l Lady Anna l The Eustace Diamonds l Framley Parsonage l The Way We Live Now l The Warden l Barchester Towers l Palliser

Lizzie Greystock’s father was a wicked man who loved wine and whist. When she is nineteen, her father dies, leaving her all his debts, and no fortune. Lizzie’s uncle the Dean of Bobsborough invites her to live at the deanery, but Lizzie decides to go to her aunt Lady Linlithgow. She has only her beauty and cleverness to help her. And she uses them both to serve her purpose well. She is a sly, heartless, mercenary, opportunistic young girl who determines to settle herself well in life.

Lady Linlithgow and Lizzie hate each other. Lizzie chooses to go to her aunt because the arrangement suits her better than life at the deanery. Lady Linlithgow takes in her niece because she feels it is her duty. Mr. Benjamin the jeweler comes to Lady Linlithgow hoping to retrieve the jewels that Admiral Greystock had purchased from him for his daughter. But Lizzie refuses to return them. She claims that they have been sold to repay other debts. But this is a lie. She has pawned the jewels for her personal expenses.

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The third novel in the Palliser series, The Eustace Diamonds is a satirical study of the influence of money and greed on human relationships in Victorian society.

The story follows two contrasting women and their courtships. Lizzie Greystock and Lucy Morris are both hampered in their love affairs by their lack of money. Lizzie’s trickery and deceit, however, contrast with Lucy’s constancy.

Lizzie Greystock, determined to marry into wealth, snares the ailing Sir Florian Eustace and quickly becomes a widow. Despite the brevity of their marriage, Lizzie inherits according to the generous terms of Sir Florian’s will, which include the Eustace diamonds. When the Eustace family solicitor, Mr. Camperdown, begins to question her legal claim to the family heirloom, Lizzie weaves a tangled web of deception and crime to gain possession of the diamonds. Enlisting the aid of her cousin, Frank, much to the dismay of Frank’s fiancée, Lizzie seeks to avoid legal prosecution while pursuing one love affair after another.

In Chapter 36 'Lizzie's guests' there is a description of Lord George de Bruce Carruthers. He has an Irish title and is a man about town with no visible means of income, 'a bitter radical'. 'He was suspected even of republican sentiments, and ignorant young men about London hinted that he was the grand centre of the British Fenians.' The account that follows is a very good fit for Fenian John O'Connor Power as he appears in the Westminster photograph circa 1875.

Lord Fawn had property in Ireland Killaud (Kill Lord) and Killagent (Kill agent). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 79.97.170.100 ( talk ) 10:26, 11 December 2012 (UTC)

Home l Lady Anna l The Eustace Diamonds l Framley Parsonage l The Way We Live Now l The Warden l Barchester Towers l Palliser

Lizzie Greystock’s father was a wicked man who loved wine and whist. When she is nineteen, her father dies, leaving her all his debts, and no fortune. Lizzie’s uncle the Dean of Bobsborough invites her to live at the deanery, but Lizzie decides to go to her aunt Lady Linlithgow. She has only her beauty and cleverness to help her. And she uses them both to serve her purpose well. She is a sly, heartless, mercenary, opportunistic young girl who determines to settle herself well in life.

Lady Linlithgow and Lizzie hate each other. Lizzie chooses to go to her aunt because the arrangement suits her better than life at the deanery. Lady Linlithgow takes in her niece because she feels it is her duty. Mr. Benjamin the jeweler comes to Lady Linlithgow hoping to retrieve the jewels that Admiral Greystock had purchased from him for his daughter. But Lizzie refuses to return them. She claims that they have been sold to repay other debts. But this is a lie. She has pawned the jewels for her personal expenses.

Home l Lady Anna l The Eustace Diamonds l Framley Parsonage l The Way We Live Now l The Warden l Barchester Towers l Palliser

Lizzie Greystock’s father was a wicked man who loved wine and whist. When she is nineteen, her father dies, leaving her all his debts, and no fortune. Lizzie’s uncle the Dean of Bobsborough invites her to live at the deanery, but Lizzie decides to go to her aunt Lady Linlithgow. She has only her beauty and cleverness to help her. And she uses them both to serve her purpose well. She is a sly, heartless, mercenary, opportunistic young girl who determines to settle herself well in life.

Lady Linlithgow and Lizzie hate each other. Lizzie chooses to go to her aunt because the arrangement suits her better than life at the deanery. Lady Linlithgow takes in her niece because she feels it is her duty. Mr. Benjamin the jeweler comes to Lady Linlithgow hoping to retrieve the jewels that Admiral Greystock had purchased from him for his daughter. But Lizzie refuses to return them. She claims that they have been sold to repay other debts. But this is a lie. She has pawned the jewels for her personal expenses.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Home l Lady Anna l The Eustace Diamonds l Framley Parsonage l The Way We Live Now l The Warden l Barchester Towers l Palliser

Lizzie Greystock’s father was a wicked man who loved wine and whist. When she is nineteen, her father dies, leaving her all his debts, and no fortune. Lizzie’s uncle the Dean of Bobsborough invites her to live at the deanery, but Lizzie decides to go to her aunt Lady Linlithgow. She has only her beauty and cleverness to help her. And she uses them both to serve her purpose well. She is a sly, heartless, mercenary, opportunistic young girl who determines to settle herself well in life.

Lady Linlithgow and Lizzie hate each other. Lizzie chooses to go to her aunt because the arrangement suits her better than life at the deanery. Lady Linlithgow takes in her niece because she feels it is her duty. Mr. Benjamin the jeweler comes to Lady Linlithgow hoping to retrieve the jewels that Admiral Greystock had purchased from him for his daughter. But Lizzie refuses to return them. She claims that they have been sold to repay other debts. But this is a lie. She has pawned the jewels for her personal expenses.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

The third novel in the Palliser series, The Eustace Diamonds is a satirical study of the influence of money and greed on human relationships in Victorian society.

The story follows two contrasting women and their courtships. Lizzie Greystock and Lucy Morris are both hampered in their love affairs by their lack of money. Lizzie’s trickery and deceit, however, contrast with Lucy’s constancy.

Lizzie Greystock, determined to marry into wealth, snares the ailing Sir Florian Eustace and quickly becomes a widow. Despite the brevity of their marriage, Lizzie inherits according to the generous terms of Sir Florian’s will, which include the Eustace diamonds. When the Eustace family solicitor, Mr. Camperdown, begins to question her legal claim to the family heirloom, Lizzie weaves a tangled web of deception and crime to gain possession of the diamonds. Enlisting the aid of her cousin, Frank, much to the dismay of Frank’s fiancée, Lizzie seeks to avoid legal prosecution while pursuing one love affair after another.


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