WEFOUNDcoriolanus: classic literature characters halloween


The history of cinema has known many great adaptations of the works of William Shakespeare. 1948 brought us the big screen version of Hamlet ; 1968 brought us Romeo and Juliet ; 1989 gave us Henry V ; and now, it is time for us to welcome the latest great Shakespearean feature film, that most definitely deserves to be given as much popularity as the mentioned adaptions of the past – 2011’s Coriolanus !

No words accurately express how brilliant this flick is. From start to finish, it is a five-star epic filled with five-star direction (from someone who, during production, had never directed a movie before), five-star scripting, five-star production design, and five-star performances from a five-star cast, all set around morals, themes and political issues that couldn’t have been discussed at a more appropriate time.

Coriolanus is certainly a project that he can proudly add to that growing and remarkable list of credits. How he managed to re-work the Bard’s text to fit perfectly within the modern setting is nothing short of genius. John Logan is practically a director’s idle writing partner – and in this project, it really shows! The teaming of a talented and accomplished Shakespearean actor like Ralph Fiennes and an equally talented and accomplished screenwriter like Logan is a match made in heaven!

“[The rich] ne’er cared for us / yet: suffer us to famish, and their store-houses / crammed with grain.”

Hear the rioting Midlanders disguised as the Roman plebeians in Shakespeare’s Coriolanus . The play  was written, probably at Stratford upon Avon, in 1608. The previous three years had seen steep hikes in the price of wheat and barley, famine, and food riots. Shakespeare adapts his source, Plutarch ’s Life of Coriolanus, a Greek biography composed in about 100 AD, to make the political crisis it portrays resemble closely the recent English experience.

In Plutarch’s text, the Roman populace are angry with the ruling class over a crisis caused by usury—unscrupulous lending of money by the rich to the poor at extortionate rates and with enslavement of debtors. But in Shakespeare’s play, Coriolanus faces a mob which is primarily protesting for another, additional reason, and it is exactly the same one as the Midlanders contemporary with the dramatist—unfair grain prices, the failure of the government to ensure adequate systems of food distribution, unregulated hoarding and widespread hunger. As the citizen says in the opening scene, the rich ‘ne’er cared for us / yet: suffer us to famish, and their store-houses / crammed with grain.’

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A remarkable edition, one that makes Shakespeare s extraordinary accomplishment more vivid than ever. James Shapiro, professor, Columbia University, bestselling author of A Year in the Life of Shakespeare: 1599
A feast of literary and historical information. The Wall Street Journal "

"A remarkable edition, one that makes Shakespeare's extraordinary accomplishment more vivid than ever."--James Shapiro, professor, Columbia University, bestselling author of A Year in the Life of Shakespeare: 1599 "A feast of literary and historical information."-- The Wall Street Journal

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) was a poet, playwright, and actor who is widely regarded as one of the most influential writers in the history of the English language. Often referred to as the Bard of Avon, Shakespeare's vast body of work includes comedic, tragic, and historical plays; poems; and 154 sonnets. His dramatic works have been translated into every major language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.

The history of cinema has known many great adaptations of the works of William Shakespeare. 1948 brought us the big screen version of Hamlet ; 1968 brought us Romeo and Juliet ; 1989 gave us Henry V ; and now, it is time for us to welcome the latest great Shakespearean feature film, that most definitely deserves to be given as much popularity as the mentioned adaptions of the past – 2011’s Coriolanus !

No words accurately express how brilliant this flick is. From start to finish, it is a five-star epic filled with five-star direction (from someone who, during production, had never directed a movie before), five-star scripting, five-star production design, and five-star performances from a five-star cast, all set around morals, themes and political issues that couldn’t have been discussed at a more appropriate time.

Coriolanus is certainly a project that he can proudly add to that growing and remarkable list of credits. How he managed to re-work the Bard’s text to fit perfectly within the modern setting is nothing short of genius. John Logan is practically a director’s idle writing partner – and in this project, it really shows! The teaming of a talented and accomplished Shakespearean actor like Ralph Fiennes and an equally talented and accomplished screenwriter like Logan is a match made in heaven!

The history of cinema has known many great adaptations of the works of William Shakespeare. 1948 brought us the big screen version of Hamlet ; 1968 brought us Romeo and Juliet ; 1989 gave us Henry V ; and now, it is time for us to welcome the latest great Shakespearean feature film, that most definitely deserves to be given as much popularity as the mentioned adaptions of the past – 2011’s Coriolanus !

No words accurately express how brilliant this flick is. From start to finish, it is a five-star epic filled with five-star direction (from someone who, during production, had never directed a movie before), five-star scripting, five-star production design, and five-star performances from a five-star cast, all set around morals, themes and political issues that couldn’t have been discussed at a more appropriate time.

Coriolanus is certainly a project that he can proudly add to that growing and remarkable list of credits. How he managed to re-work the Bard’s text to fit perfectly within the modern setting is nothing short of genius. John Logan is practically a director’s idle writing partner – and in this project, it really shows! The teaming of a talented and accomplished Shakespearean actor like Ralph Fiennes and an equally talented and accomplished screenwriter like Logan is a match made in heaven!

“[The rich] ne’er cared for us / yet: suffer us to famish, and their store-houses / crammed with grain.”

Hear the rioting Midlanders disguised as the Roman plebeians in Shakespeare’s Coriolanus . The play  was written, probably at Stratford upon Avon, in 1608. The previous three years had seen steep hikes in the price of wheat and barley, famine, and food riots. Shakespeare adapts his source, Plutarch ’s Life of Coriolanus, a Greek biography composed in about 100 AD, to make the political crisis it portrays resemble closely the recent English experience.

In Plutarch’s text, the Roman populace are angry with the ruling class over a crisis caused by usury—unscrupulous lending of money by the rich to the poor at extortionate rates and with enslavement of debtors. But in Shakespeare’s play, Coriolanus faces a mob which is primarily protesting for another, additional reason, and it is exactly the same one as the Midlanders contemporary with the dramatist—unfair grain prices, the failure of the government to ensure adequate systems of food distribution, unregulated hoarding and widespread hunger. As the citizen says in the opening scene, the rich ‘ne’er cared for us / yet: suffer us to famish, and their store-houses / crammed with grain.’


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