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Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Tropical Storm Nate is expected to impact Florida this weekend with rain and wind, even though it’s not predicted to make landfall in the state.

UPDATE: Oct. 7, 2017, 8:11 p.m. EDT Hurricane Nate made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River at about 8 p.m. ET, as a Category 1 storm with 85-mile per hour winds, the National Hurricane Center said. The storm did not intensify as much as was forecast earlier in the day Saturday, but is still bringing life-threatening storm surge flooding to coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, along with damaging winds and heavy rain. 

The storm's fast movement — at nearly 30 miles per hour at times — set a record for the fastest forward motion of any hurricane observed in the Gulf of Mexico.

It's hard to believe that we're talking about another hurricane making landfall in the U.S., following the devastating trio of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. But, here we are. This time, the storm — Hurricane Nate — is a small, potent, and fast-moving weather system that is racing toward landfall in coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, or Alabama on Saturday night. 

Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Tropical Storm Nate is expected to impact Florida this weekend with rain and wind, even though it’s not predicted to make landfall in the state.

UPDATE: Oct. 7, 2017, 8:11 p.m. EDT Hurricane Nate made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River at about 8 p.m. ET, as a Category 1 storm with 85-mile per hour winds, the National Hurricane Center said. The storm did not intensify as much as was forecast earlier in the day Saturday, but is still bringing life-threatening storm surge flooding to coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, along with damaging winds and heavy rain. 

The storm's fast movement — at nearly 30 miles per hour at times — set a record for the fastest forward motion of any hurricane observed in the Gulf of Mexico.

It's hard to believe that we're talking about another hurricane making landfall in the U.S., following the devastating trio of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. But, here we are. This time, the storm — Hurricane Nate — is a small, potent, and fast-moving weather system that is racing toward landfall in coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, or Alabama on Saturday night. 

Jess Bidgood reported from Biloxi, Miss., and John Schwartz from New Orleans. Reporting was contributed by Katy Reckdahl and Amy Virshup from New Orleans, Kalyn Wolfe from Orange Beach, Ala., and Vivian Wang from New York.

Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Tropical Storm Nate is expected to impact Florida this weekend with rain and wind, even though it’s not predicted to make landfall in the state.

Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Tropical Storm Nate is expected to impact Florida this weekend with rain and wind, even though it’s not predicted to make landfall in the state.

UPDATE: Oct. 7, 2017, 8:11 p.m. EDT Hurricane Nate made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River at about 8 p.m. ET, as a Category 1 storm with 85-mile per hour winds, the National Hurricane Center said. The storm did not intensify as much as was forecast earlier in the day Saturday, but is still bringing life-threatening storm surge flooding to coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, along with damaging winds and heavy rain. 

The storm's fast movement — at nearly 30 miles per hour at times — set a record for the fastest forward motion of any hurricane observed in the Gulf of Mexico.

It's hard to believe that we're talking about another hurricane making landfall in the U.S., following the devastating trio of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. But, here we are. This time, the storm — Hurricane Nate — is a small, potent, and fast-moving weather system that is racing toward landfall in coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, or Alabama on Saturday night. 

Jess Bidgood reported from Biloxi, Miss., and John Schwartz from New Orleans. Reporting was contributed by Katy Reckdahl and Amy Virshup from New Orleans, Kalyn Wolfe from Orange Beach, Ala., and Vivian Wang from New York.

More than 13 million Gulf Coast residents were under threat as Hurricane Nate powered toward the mainland early Saturday, bringing with it rain and storm surges to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

The hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of 90 mph, is now expected to make landfall on Saturday night between New Orleans and Mobile, Alabama, as a Category 2 storm, the National Hurricane Center said Saturday morning. It was about 180 miles south-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River, and was moving north-northwest at 26 mph, the hurricane center said.

"Nate is at our doorstep, or will be soon," New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said at a press conference Friday. A hurricane warning has been issued for the city, which is under a state of emergency.

The NHC said the storm had maximum sustained winds early on Sunday near 140km/h with weakening expected as it moves inland. It was centered about 10km north of Biloxi and moving north near at 31km/h.

It was Nate’s second landfall. Saturday night, the storm came ashore along a sparsely populated area in southeast Louisiana.

Nate was expected to pass to the east of New Orleans, sparing the city its most ferocious winds and storm surge. And its quick speed decreased the likelihood of prolonged rain that would tax the city’s weakened drainage pump system. Still, the city famous for all-night partying was placed under a curfew, effective at 7pm local time, and the streets were not nearly as crowded as they typically are on a Saturday night.

Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Hurricane Nate could impact an area from Louisiana to Florida's panhandle this weekend, the National Hurricane Center says.

Tropical Storm Nate is expected to impact Florida this weekend with rain and wind, even though it’s not predicted to make landfall in the state.

UPDATE: Oct. 7, 2017, 8:11 p.m. EDT Hurricane Nate made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River at about 8 p.m. ET, as a Category 1 storm with 85-mile per hour winds, the National Hurricane Center said. The storm did not intensify as much as was forecast earlier in the day Saturday, but is still bringing life-threatening storm surge flooding to coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, along with damaging winds and heavy rain. 

The storm's fast movement — at nearly 30 miles per hour at times — set a record for the fastest forward motion of any hurricane observed in the Gulf of Mexico.

It's hard to believe that we're talking about another hurricane making landfall in the U.S., following the devastating trio of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. But, here we are. This time, the storm — Hurricane Nate — is a small, potent, and fast-moving weather system that is racing toward landfall in coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, or Alabama on Saturday night. 

Jess Bidgood reported from Biloxi, Miss., and John Schwartz from New Orleans. Reporting was contributed by Katy Reckdahl and Amy Virshup from New Orleans, Kalyn Wolfe from Orange Beach, Ala., and Vivian Wang from New York.

More than 13 million Gulf Coast residents were under threat as Hurricane Nate powered toward the mainland early Saturday, bringing with it rain and storm surges to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

The hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of 90 mph, is now expected to make landfall on Saturday night between New Orleans and Mobile, Alabama, as a Category 2 storm, the National Hurricane Center said Saturday morning. It was about 180 miles south-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River, and was moving north-northwest at 26 mph, the hurricane center said.

"Nate is at our doorstep, or will be soon," New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said at a press conference Friday. A hurricane warning has been issued for the city, which is under a state of emergency.


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