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The Plot: Based on interviews and dramatic recreations, “The Exiles” covers a group of Native Americans who left their respective reservations, making them “exiles” of their community, but forming a new community of their own. Yvonne (Yvonne Williams) wishes for a better life for her children, while her husband Homer (Homer Nish) goes out drinking and playing poker. Meanwhile Tommy (Tommy Reynolds) joins Homer in his drinking and tries to pick up pretty much any woman in sight. All of this occurs over a few hours on a dark, very film-noir night in L.A.’s Bunker Hill district.

Why It Matters: The NFR salutes the film as “one of the few non-stereotypical films that honestly depict Native Americans.” An essay by film professor Catherine Russell offers more insight on the film and its significance.

But Does It Really?: As is often the case with docudramas like this and “ Nanook of the North ”, I’m always a little concerned about recommending a film that might not be the most accurate depiction of a specific culture. But enough people with far more credibility than I have called this film true to life, and that’s good enough for me. I just wish the film were a little more polished. There are long stretches where nothing happens, and it’s only 72 minutes! Regardless, “The Exiles” takes a unique approach to a largely ignored culture, and that’s what film preservation is all about.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Kent MacKenzie's forgotten indie basks in the retroactive glow of never having had a theatrical release -- as if that somehow makes it a work of misunderstood genius.

The Plot: Based on interviews and dramatic recreations, “The Exiles” covers a group of Native Americans who left their respective reservations, making them “exiles” of their community, but forming a new community of their own. Yvonne (Yvonne Williams) wishes for a better life for her children, while her husband Homer (Homer Nish) goes out drinking and playing poker. Meanwhile Tommy (Tommy Reynolds) joins Homer in his drinking and tries to pick up pretty much any woman in sight. All of this occurs over a few hours on a dark, very film-noir night in L.A.’s Bunker Hill district.

Why It Matters: The NFR salutes the film as “one of the few non-stereotypical films that honestly depict Native Americans.” An essay by film professor Catherine Russell offers more insight on the film and its significance.

But Does It Really?: As is often the case with docudramas like this and “ Nanook of the North ”, I’m always a little concerned about recommending a film that might not be the most accurate depiction of a specific culture. But enough people with far more credibility than I have called this film true to life, and that’s good enough for me. I just wish the film were a little more polished. There are long stretches where nothing happens, and it’s only 72 minutes! Regardless, “The Exiles” takes a unique approach to a largely ignored culture, and that’s what film preservation is all about.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Kent MacKenzie's forgotten indie basks in the retroactive glow of never having had a theatrical release -- as if that somehow makes it a work of misunderstood genius.

Чужой (1979)
# 52 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Michelle Williams »
# 62 on STARmeter

Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!

The Plot: Based on interviews and dramatic recreations, “The Exiles” covers a group of Native Americans who left their respective reservations, making them “exiles” of their community, but forming a new community of their own. Yvonne (Yvonne Williams) wishes for a better life for her children, while her husband Homer (Homer Nish) goes out drinking and playing poker. Meanwhile Tommy (Tommy Reynolds) joins Homer in his drinking and tries to pick up pretty much any woman in sight. All of this occurs over a few hours on a dark, very film-noir night in L.A.’s Bunker Hill district.

Why It Matters: The NFR salutes the film as “one of the few non-stereotypical films that honestly depict Native Americans.” An essay by film professor Catherine Russell offers more insight on the film and its significance.

But Does It Really?: As is often the case with docudramas like this and “ Nanook of the North ”, I’m always a little concerned about recommending a film that might not be the most accurate depiction of a specific culture. But enough people with far more credibility than I have called this film true to life, and that’s good enough for me. I just wish the film were a little more polished. There are long stretches where nothing happens, and it’s only 72 minutes! Regardless, “The Exiles” takes a unique approach to a largely ignored culture, and that’s what film preservation is all about.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Kent MacKenzie's forgotten indie basks in the retroactive glow of never having had a theatrical release -- as if that somehow makes it a work of misunderstood genius.

Чужой (1979)
# 52 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Michelle Williams »
# 62 on STARmeter

Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!

In fact, this whole “march to the people” of the populists ended in failure. And not only because of some inadvertent gunshot directed against the Tsar (Solovyov, 1879), which obliged them all to flee the country and to hide very far from the cities. But above all because the peasants, perfectly deaf to their preaching, were even sometimes ready to hand them over to the authorities. The populists, the Russians (hardly more fortunate) like the Jews, lost “the faith… in a spontaneous revolutionary will and in the socialist instincts of the peasantry”, and “transformed into impenitent pessimists.” 29

The Plot: Based on interviews and dramatic recreations, “The Exiles” covers a group of Native Americans who left their respective reservations, making them “exiles” of their community, but forming a new community of their own. Yvonne (Yvonne Williams) wishes for a better life for her children, while her husband Homer (Homer Nish) goes out drinking and playing poker. Meanwhile Tommy (Tommy Reynolds) joins Homer in his drinking and tries to pick up pretty much any woman in sight. All of this occurs over a few hours on a dark, very film-noir night in L.A.’s Bunker Hill district.

Why It Matters: The NFR salutes the film as “one of the few non-stereotypical films that honestly depict Native Americans.” An essay by film professor Catherine Russell offers more insight on the film and its significance.

But Does It Really?: As is often the case with docudramas like this and “ Nanook of the North ”, I’m always a little concerned about recommending a film that might not be the most accurate depiction of a specific culture. But enough people with far more credibility than I have called this film true to life, and that’s good enough for me. I just wish the film were a little more polished. There are long stretches where nothing happens, and it’s only 72 minutes! Regardless, “The Exiles” takes a unique approach to a largely ignored culture, and that’s what film preservation is all about.


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