WEFOUNDtimeline of byzantine history emperor


During the Macedonian dynasty (10th–11th centuries), the Empire again expanded and experienced the two-century long Macedonian Renaissance , which came to an end with the loss of much of Asia Minor to the Seljuk Turks after the Battle of Manzikert in 1071. This battle opened the way for the Turks to settle in Anatolia .

Although the Byzantine Empire had a multi-ethnic character during most of its history [16] and preserved Romano-Hellenistic traditions, [17] it became identified by its western and northern contemporaries with its increasingly predominant Greek element . [18] The occasional use of the term "Empire of the Greeks" (Latin: Imperium Graecorum ) in the West to refer to the Eastern Roman Empire and of the Byzantine Emperor as Imperator Graecorum (Emperor of the Greeks) [19] were also used to separate it from the prestige of the Roman Empire within the new kingdoms of the West. [20]

The authority of the Byzantine emperor as the legitimate Roman emperor was challenged by the coronation of Charlemagne as Imperator Augustus by Pope Leo III in the year 800. Needing Charlemagne's support in his struggle against his enemies in Rome, Leo used the lack of a male occupant of the throne of the Roman Empire at the time to claim that it was vacant and that he could therefore crown a new Emperor himself. [21]

The Byzantine Empire started as the Eastern Roman Empire in 330 CE when Constantine , a Roman emperor, founded Constantinople , the Roman Empire's new capital, on the ancient site of Byzantium .

'Byzantine' is a 19th century term that modern scholars have applied to this culture and its people. Byzantines, on the other hand, called themselves 'Romans' from the beginning of the Byzantine Empire until its fall to the Ottomans in 1453, which was long after the Western Roman Empire collapsed in 476 CE. Thus, most of the history of Byzantium is a continuation of the Roman period, and most of the culture of Byzantium is a continuation of the Roman way of life.

One of the major changes in Byzantine culture from late Roman culture is the emergence of Christianity. After Constantine issued the 313 Edict of Milan , which made Christianity a tolerable religion, the practice of Christianity spread throughout the Roman Empire at an unprecedented rate. Churches and other meeting places quickly developed and changed the landscape.

The History of the Church is a vital part of the Orthodox Christian faith. Orthodox Christians are defined significantly by their continuity with all those who have gone before, those who first received and preached the truth of Jesus Christ to the world, those who helped to formulate the expression and worship of our faith, and those who continue to move forward in the unchanging yet ever-dynamic Holy Tradition of the Orthodox Church .

During the Macedonian dynasty (10th–11th centuries), the Empire again expanded and experienced the two-century long Macedonian Renaissance , which came to an end with the loss of much of Asia Minor to the Seljuk Turks after the Battle of Manzikert in 1071. This battle opened the way for the Turks to settle in Anatolia .

Although the Byzantine Empire had a multi-ethnic character during most of its history [16] and preserved Romano-Hellenistic traditions, [17] it became identified by its western and northern contemporaries with its increasingly predominant Greek element . [18] The occasional use of the term "Empire of the Greeks" (Latin: Imperium Graecorum ) in the West to refer to the Eastern Roman Empire and of the Byzantine Emperor as Imperator Graecorum (Emperor of the Greeks) [19] were also used to separate it from the prestige of the Roman Empire within the new kingdoms of the West. [20]

The authority of the Byzantine emperor as the legitimate Roman emperor was challenged by the coronation of Charlemagne as Imperator Augustus by Pope Leo III in the year 800. Needing Charlemagne's support in his struggle against his enemies in Rome, Leo used the lack of a male occupant of the throne of the Roman Empire at the time to claim that it was vacant and that he could therefore crown a new Emperor himself. [21]

During the Macedonian dynasty (10th–11th centuries), the Empire again expanded and experienced the two-century long Macedonian Renaissance , which came to an end with the loss of much of Asia Minor to the Seljuk Turks after the Battle of Manzikert in 1071. This battle opened the way for the Turks to settle in Anatolia .

Although the Byzantine Empire had a multi-ethnic character during most of its history [16] and preserved Romano-Hellenistic traditions, [17] it became identified by its western and northern contemporaries with its increasingly predominant Greek element . [18] The occasional use of the term "Empire of the Greeks" (Latin: Imperium Graecorum ) in the West to refer to the Eastern Roman Empire and of the Byzantine Emperor as Imperator Graecorum (Emperor of the Greeks) [19] were also used to separate it from the prestige of the Roman Empire within the new kingdoms of the West. [20]

The authority of the Byzantine emperor as the legitimate Roman emperor was challenged by the coronation of Charlemagne as Imperator Augustus by Pope Leo III in the year 800. Needing Charlemagne's support in his struggle against his enemies in Rome, Leo used the lack of a male occupant of the throne of the Roman Empire at the time to claim that it was vacant and that he could therefore crown a new Emperor himself. [21]

The Byzantine Empire started as the Eastern Roman Empire in 330 CE when Constantine , a Roman emperor, founded Constantinople , the Roman Empire's new capital, on the ancient site of Byzantium .

'Byzantine' is a 19th century term that modern scholars have applied to this culture and its people. Byzantines, on the other hand, called themselves 'Romans' from the beginning of the Byzantine Empire until its fall to the Ottomans in 1453, which was long after the Western Roman Empire collapsed in 476 CE. Thus, most of the history of Byzantium is a continuation of the Roman period, and most of the culture of Byzantium is a continuation of the Roman way of life.

One of the major changes in Byzantine culture from late Roman culture is the emergence of Christianity. After Constantine issued the 313 Edict of Milan , which made Christianity a tolerable religion, the practice of Christianity spread throughout the Roman Empire at an unprecedented rate. Churches and other meeting places quickly developed and changed the landscape.


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