WEFOUNDtimeline of byzantine history documentary


This is a list of the Byzantine emperors from the foundation of Constantinople in 330 AD, which marks the conventional start of the Byzantine Empire (or the Eastern Roman Empire), to its fall to the Ottoman Empire in 1453 AD. Only the emperors who were recognized as legitimate rulers and exercised sovereign authority are included, to the exclusion of junior co-emperors ( symbasileis ) who never attained the status of sole or senior ruler, as well as of the various usurpers or rebels who claimed the imperial title.

Traditionally, the line of Byzantine emperors is held to begin with the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great , the first Christian emperor, who rebuilt the city of Byzantium as an imperial capital, Constantinople, and who was regarded by the later emperors as the model ruler. It was under Constantine that the major characteristics of what is considered the Byzantine state emerged: a Roman polity centered at Constantinople and culturally dominated by the Greek East , with Christianity as the state religion .

In the medieval period, dynasties were common, but the principle of hereditary succession was never formalized in the Empire, [3] and hereditary succession was a custom rather than an inviolable principle. [1]

This is a list of the Byzantine emperors from the foundation of Constantinople in 330 AD, which marks the conventional start of the Byzantine Empire (or the Eastern Roman Empire), to its fall to the Ottoman Empire in 1453 AD. Only the emperors who were recognized as legitimate rulers and exercised sovereign authority are included, to the exclusion of junior co-emperors ( symbasileis ) who never attained the status of sole or senior ruler, as well as of the various usurpers or rebels who claimed the imperial title.

Traditionally, the line of Byzantine emperors is held to begin with the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great , the first Christian emperor, who rebuilt the city of Byzantium as an imperial capital, Constantinople, and who was regarded by the later emperors as the model ruler. It was under Constantine that the major characteristics of what is considered the Byzantine state emerged: a Roman polity centered at Constantinople and culturally dominated by the Greek East , with Christianity as the state religion .

In the medieval period, dynasties were common, but the principle of hereditary succession was never formalized in the Empire, [3] and hereditary succession was a custom rather than an inviolable principle. [1]

The Second Arab Siege of Constantinople (717-718) was a combined land and sea effort by the Arabs to take the capital city of the Byzantine Empire,... Read more

330 AD:    Constantine founds the new capital of the Roman Empire on the existing site of the ancient Greek city Byzantium:    Byzantium was renamed Constantinople and it would become the capital of the Byzantine Empire.

395:    The Roman Empire divides in half, with the Eastern Roman Empire based in Constantinople and the Western Roman Empire based in Rome/Ravenna.

476:    The Western Empire Falls:    The Eastern Empire survives and now is labeled as the Byzantine Empire.

This is a list of the Byzantine emperors from the foundation of Constantinople in 330 AD, which marks the conventional start of the Byzantine Empire (or the Eastern Roman Empire), to its fall to the Ottoman Empire in 1453 AD. Only the emperors who were recognized as legitimate rulers and exercised sovereign authority are included, to the exclusion of junior co-emperors ( symbasileis ) who never attained the status of sole or senior ruler, as well as of the various usurpers or rebels who claimed the imperial title.

Traditionally, the line of Byzantine emperors is held to begin with the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great , the first Christian emperor, who rebuilt the city of Byzantium as an imperial capital, Constantinople, and who was regarded by the later emperors as the model ruler. It was under Constantine that the major characteristics of what is considered the Byzantine state emerged: a Roman polity centered at Constantinople and culturally dominated by the Greek East , with Christianity as the state religion .

In the medieval period, dynasties were common, but the principle of hereditary succession was never formalized in the Empire, [3] and hereditary succession was a custom rather than an inviolable principle. [1]

The Second Arab Siege of Constantinople (717-718) was a combined land and sea effort by the Arabs to take the capital city of the Byzantine Empire,... Read more

This is a list of the Byzantine emperors from the foundation of Constantinople in 330 AD, which marks the conventional start of the Byzantine Empire (or the Eastern Roman Empire), to its fall to the Ottoman Empire in 1453 AD. Only the emperors who were recognized as legitimate rulers and exercised sovereign authority are included, to the exclusion of junior co-emperors ( symbasileis ) who never attained the status of sole or senior ruler, as well as of the various usurpers or rebels who claimed the imperial title.

Traditionally, the line of Byzantine emperors is held to begin with the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great , the first Christian emperor, who rebuilt the city of Byzantium as an imperial capital, Constantinople, and who was regarded by the later emperors as the model ruler. It was under Constantine that the major characteristics of what is considered the Byzantine state emerged: a Roman polity centered at Constantinople and culturally dominated by the Greek East , with Christianity as the state religion .

In the medieval period, dynasties were common, but the principle of hereditary succession was never formalized in the Empire, [3] and hereditary succession was a custom rather than an inviolable principle. [1]

The Second Arab Siege of Constantinople (717-718) was a combined land and sea effort by the Arabs to take the capital city of the Byzantine Empire,... Read more

330 AD:    Constantine founds the new capital of the Roman Empire on the existing site of the ancient Greek city Byzantium:    Byzantium was renamed Constantinople and it would become the capital of the Byzantine Empire.

395:    The Roman Empire divides in half, with the Eastern Roman Empire based in Constantinople and the Western Roman Empire based in Rome/Ravenna.

476:    The Western Empire Falls:    The Eastern Empire survives and now is labeled as the Byzantine Empire.

This history lecture podcast covers the little known Byzantine Empire through the study of twelve of its greatest rulers. Mr. Lars Brownworth presents this series for free through this website and iTunes .

Mr. Brownworth, author of Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire That Rescued Western Civilization , taught History at The Stony Brook School on Long Island, New York. His passion for Byzantine history has taken him from the furthest reaches of the Byzantine Empire right into Constantinople (present day Istanbul), the very heart of Byzantium. He has studied Byzantine history extensively and produced this lecture series, giving us a concise overview of this ignored period.

You can purchase Mr. Brownworth's new book, Lost to the West , in stores or online in hardcover and audiobook forms. Please take a moment to add your email address to the list if you would like to get updates on Mr. Brownworth's projects.


41Xnrn7sQxL