WEFOUNDBorn to Fish How an Obsessed Angler Became the World’s Greatest Striped Bass Fisherman


There are three types of fish reproduction. The first and most common one, found in 97% of fish, is ovaparity. The other two types are oviviparity and viviparity. As in humans, male fish produce sperm, and female fish produce eggs in their ovaries.

The most common fish reproduction, ovaparity, is an external fertilization process in which unfertilized eggs are laid. This is called spawning. A few species of fish, such as salmon, migrate long distances to spawn. Depending on the species of fish, eggs are laid in various places and methods to protect the eggs from predators. Some species prepare nests, some make bubble structures to protect the eggs and others incubate the eggs in their mouths. The percentage of eggs laid externally that survive to become fish is very small, so multiple eggs are laid at the same time.

Viviparity is an internal fertilization and development process most familiar to humans. An embryo is attached to the mother's blood supply, similar to a placenta, so it receives direct nourishment from the mother and is born alive.

Goldfish are easy to find, inexpensive to buy and simple to raise. Getting them to breed is another story, however, requiring some work. Goldfish in the wild breed naturally in the spring, when the temperature starts to rise a bit. The higher temperatures inspire the fish to spawn. Goldfish in aquariums, however, need more work to spawn. The aquarist must provide them with warmer water, plenty of early morning light to spawn in, and spawning mops.

Goldfish spawn under specific conditions. In outdoor ponds these are determined by changing weather. In late April or May, depending on the climate of the region, the goldfish will begin to chase each other. Once the water is warmer, these chases conclude with actual spawning. In an aquarium, there should be more males than females, as well as brighter light in the mornings to inspire the fish to spawn.

The goldfish group together, with several males all chasing a female, attempting to rub up against her and stimulate her enough to get her to eject her eggs, which are then fertilized by all of the males. In this way, several male goldfish can fertilize a single female's many eggs. The eggs attach to greenery in the pond and, depending on the warmth of the water, will hatch anywhere from a few days to a week later.

There are three types of fish reproduction. The first and most common one, found in 97% of fish, is ovaparity. The other two types are oviviparity and viviparity. As in humans, male fish produce sperm, and female fish produce eggs in their ovaries.

The most common fish reproduction, ovaparity, is an external fertilization process in which unfertilized eggs are laid. This is called spawning. A few species of fish, such as salmon, migrate long distances to spawn. Depending on the species of fish, eggs are laid in various places and methods to protect the eggs from predators. Some species prepare nests, some make bubble structures to protect the eggs and others incubate the eggs in their mouths. The percentage of eggs laid externally that survive to become fish is very small, so multiple eggs are laid at the same time.

Viviparity is an internal fertilization and development process most familiar to humans. An embryo is attached to the mother's blood supply, similar to a placenta, so it receives direct nourishment from the mother and is born alive.


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