WEFOUNDthe question comic


Comic-Con is wonderful opportunity for fans to get way too close to their favorite television stars, and one of the few venues where anyone with a Comic-Con badge can get near enough to Ian Somerhalder to smell him (he smells like cotton candy and chrysanthemums, in case you were wondering). The 'Con is also a TV blogger's dream and one of the rare places where one can shove a personal voice recorder in an actor's face without fear of being handcuffed.


1. "What do you think of Comic-Con?" / "Are you surprised by the Comic-Con reaction?"
I understand the intention behind this one, because Comic-Con is absolutely insane and we're all caught up in the moment. But in asking a good question, you shouldn't be able to anticipate the answer. And the answer to this one is always, "Oh my God! It's crazy! The fans are really supportive, and it's great to be here," as they check their watch. Until someone answers, "I fucking hate this place," let's leave this one off the notepad, please.


2. "Tell us about your character."
Again, I understand the intention, but this is also known as the "I've never seen your show" question. Nothing that can be readily answered by Wikipedia should be asked during an interview. Exception: This question is okay for actors on new shows that haven't debuted yet.

Where other heroes choose to be self-made neurotics, the Question and Mr. A choose to be psychologically and intellectually healthy. It's a choice everyone has to make.

Reporter Rex Graine is a newspaper reporter driven by his A=A / black and white ideals to fight the evil (black) with the powers of good (white) through means of physical intervention and verbal philosophizing. Graine opens his secret closet and inside are the suit, fedora and rigid metal false face that he uses in his nightly mission.

Much as the Question had a calling card featuring a Question mark, Mr. A also had a trademark card that was equally divided, one half black and one half white. One wonders whether or not that should have been the coloring for the similarly shaped/divided panel at the end of the Blue Beetle story in Blue Beetle v.1 #5.

Comic-Con is wonderful opportunity for fans to get way too close to their favorite television stars, and one of the few venues where anyone with a Comic-Con badge can get near enough to Ian Somerhalder to smell him (he smells like cotton candy and chrysanthemums, in case you were wondering). The 'Con is also a TV blogger's dream and one of the rare places where one can shove a personal voice recorder in an actor's face without fear of being handcuffed.


1. "What do you think of Comic-Con?" / "Are you surprised by the Comic-Con reaction?"
I understand the intention behind this one, because Comic-Con is absolutely insane and we're all caught up in the moment. But in asking a good question, you shouldn't be able to anticipate the answer. And the answer to this one is always, "Oh my God! It's crazy! The fans are really supportive, and it's great to be here," as they check their watch. Until someone answers, "I fucking hate this place," let's leave this one off the notepad, please.


2. "Tell us about your character."
Again, I understand the intention, but this is also known as the "I've never seen your show" question. Nothing that can be readily answered by Wikipedia should be asked during an interview. Exception: This question is okay for actors on new shows that haven't debuted yet.

Where other heroes choose to be self-made neurotics, the Question and Mr. A choose to be psychologically and intellectually healthy. It's a choice everyone has to make.

Reporter Rex Graine is a newspaper reporter driven by his A=A / black and white ideals to fight the evil (black) with the powers of good (white) through means of physical intervention and verbal philosophizing. Graine opens his secret closet and inside are the suit, fedora and rigid metal false face that he uses in his nightly mission.

Much as the Question had a calling card featuring a Question mark, Mr. A also had a trademark card that was equally divided, one half black and one half white. One wonders whether or not that should have been the coloring for the similarly shaped/divided panel at the end of the Blue Beetle story in Blue Beetle v.1 #5.

I’m glad you take the time each week….I enjoy your comic,,,even tho I could stand it more frequently,,,but once a week is better than not at all. Thanks for insight into the “mind” of a cat..

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Comic-Con is wonderful opportunity for fans to get way too close to their favorite television stars, and one of the few venues where anyone with a Comic-Con badge can get near enough to Ian Somerhalder to smell him (he smells like cotton candy and chrysanthemums, in case you were wondering). The 'Con is also a TV blogger's dream and one of the rare places where one can shove a personal voice recorder in an actor's face without fear of being handcuffed.


1. "What do you think of Comic-Con?" / "Are you surprised by the Comic-Con reaction?"
I understand the intention behind this one, because Comic-Con is absolutely insane and we're all caught up in the moment. But in asking a good question, you shouldn't be able to anticipate the answer. And the answer to this one is always, "Oh my God! It's crazy! The fans are really supportive, and it's great to be here," as they check their watch. Until someone answers, "I fucking hate this place," let's leave this one off the notepad, please.


2. "Tell us about your character."
Again, I understand the intention, but this is also known as the "I've never seen your show" question. Nothing that can be readily answered by Wikipedia should be asked during an interview. Exception: This question is okay for actors on new shows that haven't debuted yet.


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