WEFOUNDthe question comics


The Question came to DC in part of a gift purchase of the Charlton "Action Heroes" -- Captain Atom, Nightshade, Blue Beetle, Son of Vulcan, Judomaster, Thunderbolt, Sarge Steel and the Question -- for then-DC editor, former Charlton writer/editor Dick Giordano. The original plan, as detailed in the article, "Project Blockbuster" by Robert Greenberger in Comic Book Artist #09 , was for the Charlton characters to feature in short, serialized stories in a monthly series, with the Question's particular stories to be penned by Mike W. Barr and drawn by Stan Woch. This idea soon went bust, with little artwork actually completed.

The Action Heroes made their debut in the DCU as Earth-4, one of many alternate worlds being collapsed into one during the historic Crisis on Infinite Earths in 1986, and many of their fold earned solo books, including Blue Beetle (where the Question made his first post-Crisis story appearance), and the Question himself. All of this, of course, while the seminal Alan Moore/Dave Gibbons maxiseries The Watchmen riffed on a sort of alternate universe version of the Action Heroes.

After the Question series, and a brief follow-up Question Quarterly finished their runs, Vic Sage skipped here and there across the DC universe, making appearances in other O'Neil-penned one-shots and cameos in other characters' books. Giordano joined writer/inker Bob Layton (former Charlton Bullseye publisher) for a simple-but-fun six-issue teaming of the Charlton heroes called the L.A.W. Under the helm of writer Greg Rucka, a self-professed fan of the O'Neil series in college, the Question began a relationship with Gotham vigilante The Huntress in a six-part series called Cry For Blood.

Series featuring the Question , which began in the late-eighties and continued for 36 issues until it was canceled. It was revived for a single issue, #37, as part of the Blackest Night event. This series continued into Question Quarterly (1990) and The Question Returns (1997).

Also popular was O'Neil's recommended reading list featured in the letters column that featured a wide variety of fiction and non-fiction.

Until you earn 1000 points all your submissions need to be vetted by other Comic Vine users. This process takes no more than a few hours and we'll send you an email once approved.

The Question came to DC in part of a gift purchase of the Charlton "Action Heroes" -- Captain Atom, Nightshade, Blue Beetle, Son of Vulcan, Judomaster, Thunderbolt, Sarge Steel and the Question -- for then-DC editor, former Charlton writer/editor Dick Giordano. The original plan, as detailed in the article, "Project Blockbuster" by Robert Greenberger in Comic Book Artist #09 , was for the Charlton characters to feature in short, serialized stories in a monthly series, with the Question's particular stories to be penned by Mike W. Barr and drawn by Stan Woch. This idea soon went bust, with little artwork actually completed.

The Action Heroes made their debut in the DCU as Earth-4, one of many alternate worlds being collapsed into one during the historic Crisis on Infinite Earths in 1986, and many of their fold earned solo books, including Blue Beetle (where the Question made his first post-Crisis story appearance), and the Question himself. All of this, of course, while the seminal Alan Moore/Dave Gibbons maxiseries The Watchmen riffed on a sort of alternate universe version of the Action Heroes.

After the Question series, and a brief follow-up Question Quarterly finished their runs, Vic Sage skipped here and there across the DC universe, making appearances in other O'Neil-penned one-shots and cameos in other characters' books. Giordano joined writer/inker Bob Layton (former Charlton Bullseye publisher) for a simple-but-fun six-issue teaming of the Charlton heroes called the L.A.W. Under the helm of writer Greg Rucka, a self-professed fan of the O'Neil series in college, the Question began a relationship with Gotham vigilante The Huntress in a six-part series called Cry For Blood.

The Question came to DC in part of a gift purchase of the Charlton "Action Heroes" -- Captain Atom, Nightshade, Blue Beetle, Son of Vulcan, Judomaster, Thunderbolt, Sarge Steel and the Question -- for then-DC editor, former Charlton writer/editor Dick Giordano. The original plan, as detailed in the article, "Project Blockbuster" by Robert Greenberger in Comic Book Artist #09 , was for the Charlton characters to feature in short, serialized stories in a monthly series, with the Question's particular stories to be penned by Mike W. Barr and drawn by Stan Woch. This idea soon went bust, with little artwork actually completed.

The Action Heroes made their debut in the DCU as Earth-4, one of many alternate worlds being collapsed into one during the historic Crisis on Infinite Earths in 1986, and many of their fold earned solo books, including Blue Beetle (where the Question made his first post-Crisis story appearance), and the Question himself. All of this, of course, while the seminal Alan Moore/Dave Gibbons maxiseries The Watchmen riffed on a sort of alternate universe version of the Action Heroes.

After the Question series, and a brief follow-up Question Quarterly finished their runs, Vic Sage skipped here and there across the DC universe, making appearances in other O'Neil-penned one-shots and cameos in other characters' books. Giordano joined writer/inker Bob Layton (former Charlton Bullseye publisher) for a simple-but-fun six-issue teaming of the Charlton heroes called the L.A.W. Under the helm of writer Greg Rucka, a self-professed fan of the O'Neil series in college, the Question began a relationship with Gotham vigilante The Huntress in a six-part series called Cry For Blood.

Series featuring the Question , which began in the late-eighties and continued for 36 issues until it was canceled. It was revived for a single issue, #37, as part of the Blackest Night event. This series continued into Question Quarterly (1990) and The Question Returns (1997).

Also popular was O'Neil's recommended reading list featured in the letters column that featured a wide variety of fiction and non-fiction.

Until you earn 1000 points all your submissions need to be vetted by other Comic Vine users. This process takes no more than a few hours and we'll send you an email once approved.

I’m really loving Renee Montoya as The Question. I remember reading her earliest stories in Batman comics; Mistah J kept commenting how cool she was, but I didn’t really understand why. She was a minor character, a good cop but nothing all that remarkable.

Oh how far we’ve come.  Her entire transition from GCPD cop to masked vigilante has been so brilliantly done, and The Five Books of Bood continues to further develop her character.  This story picks up where the events of 52 left off: Renee is following up on leads about the Crime Bible, studying it as much as she can in order to know her enemy, the same enemy that tried to murder Kate Kane.

The book teaches four lessons, each of which Montoya must face and overcome in her travels.  Deceit, lust, green, murder: all are tenants that Renee must stare down, and all she eventually succumbs to.  Her trial ends in one last battle against the Monk, the leader of the dark faith; she refuses to kill him, but to protect herself she shoves him away, as he falls to his death.  It wasn’t intentional (or was it?) but it’s done, and now Montoya is faced with a brand new dilemma:  is she to be the new leader of this cult?


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